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On June 2nd, 1924, the United States Congress passed the Indian Citizenship Act which granted citizenship to all Native Americans born within the territorial limits of the country. However, associated privileges, including the right to vote, were determined by state law and took decades to advance. The granting of citizenship applied to roughly 125,000 ...
Originated by the League of American Bicyclists in 1956, Bike to Work Day usually occurs in Bike to Work Week which usually falls within May of every year; the annual event aims to promote biking as a excellent option for commuting; it is less expensive, more environmentally friendly, and healthier than driving a car or using modes of public transportation. On Bike-to-Work Day numerous organization...
For years an impressive painting of Florence Nightingale sat among an historic collection of Teachers College portraiture, waiting to be displayed in the Offit Gallery, Third Floor of the Gottesman Libraries. Frederick Rocher's work was exhibited in 2016 as part of the Restored Oil Paintings...
On May 2, 1963 over 1,000 African American schoolchildren skipped class to march through the streets of Birmingham, Alabama in support of desegregation, inspired and guided by the leadership of Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. in the fight for civil rights. The "Children's March" or "Children's Crusade" led to the arrest of nearly 800 demonstrators, as teachers and students sang hymns in peace. ...
One of the pioneering Teachers College alumni in the field of dance education, Margaret Newell H'Doubler was born on April 26th, 1889 in Beloit, Kansas. H'Doubler founded the first major in dance at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, after studying there for a degree in biology and philosophy, as well as at Teachers College in 1916, where she pursued philosophy and aesthetics. She began teaching dance in the summer of 1917, comb...
On April 22nd, 2016 the signing of the Paris Agreement marked the pledge of 175 countries to address climate change. Key was the opportunity to "strengthen the global response to the threat of climate change by keeping a global temperature rise this century well below 2 degrees Celsius and to pursue efforts to limit the temperature increase even further to 1.5 degrees Celsius." A special
On April 15th, 2019, Notre Dame de Paris, arguably the most famous of the Gothic Cathedrals of the Middle Ages, caught fire. Located on Île de la Cité, and a designated World Heritage Site, Notre Dame was built on the ruins of two earlier churches and suffered damage from wars and other serious effects through the centuries. The cathedral was saved during the French Revolution by Napoleon Bonapart who crowned hims...
Seventeen years ago, April 1st, 2004 marks the day when Google launched a limited beta release a new free e-mail service. Google engineer Paul Buchheit created and developed Gmail, initially known under the code name Caribou
Born March 25th, 1900, the eighth and youngest child of the Reverend and Mrs. William James Howard of Washington, D.C., Ruth Winifred Howard was the first African American woman to complete a doctorate in psychology, having researched the development of 229 sets of triplets from their early infancy to 79 years of age. She received her Ph.D, entitled "A Study of the Development of Tr...
On March 11th, 2020 the World Health Organization declared a severe respiratory illness, known as COVID-19, which was caused by a novel coronavirus, to be a pandemic. The virus first appeared in Wuhan, China in December 2019 with symptoms that included fever, cough, headache, fatigue, breathing diff...